Training

7 Of The Most Stubborn, Challenging-To-Train Dog Breeds

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Dogs and their owners have a special bond and relationship. At times, they can be the most faithful and loyal companions a person could have. Whether trained or not, they will still be adorable and loved. There are some breeds that are notoriously tough to train, even by the most skilled professional dog-trainers. Sometimes it is because some breeds are more stubborn, some are independent thinkers, and some have certain behavioral traits in their bloodline that make training difficult. For example, dog breeds bred to hunt will be focused on scents of other animals and will not allow anything to distract them, including their owners. So it is best to research what breed will best suit you. If you don’t mind having a tough time training your dog, any breed will do. But if you want to avoid difficult dog breeds, this list is for you. national detector dog training center

7. Afghan Hound

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All hounds tend to be difficult to train, but the Afghan Hound may be the most difficult. The dogs have beautiful thick, long, and silky coats. They were bred to live comfortably in Afghanistan’s cold mountain regions. These dogs are almost cat-like in personality. They are intelligent and, trained as a “sighthound”, these dogs can be physically and emotionally sensitive. They don’t desire to please so praise training doesn’t always work well. The dogs can be trained but because of their independence, the training often doesn’t stick. The best things to consider when training an Afghan Hound are gentleness, patience, coaxing, and persistence. If an Afghan Hound feels comfortable, the dog will adapt well to people. Professional training may be necessary for this breed.

6. Siberian Husky

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The Siberian Husky originated in northeastern Siberia, Russia as a hunting dog. The dog has a thick double coat to protect it from the elements and quickly gained popularity in the arctic regions where it is used as a sled dog. As a pack dog, your husky may take on the Alpha role so authority must be established. Firm discipline is important in training the husky and of course, rewarding good behavior. Huskies tend to jump, chew, dig and bite which must be corrected early on. The Siberian Husky can make a great family dog with proper, firm, and consistent training.

5. Basset Hound

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This dog was bred to hunt hare in England and France. They are skilled at tracking scents and do not get distracted when they are. They are known to be pack leaders and are very independent thinkers. Also stubborn and aloof, but gentle and loyal. Training a Basset Hound requires a lot of patience, and the trainer must assert authority. They need social training as well to be able to get along with other people and dogs. If socialized properly, they are less of a difficulty. Best get a professional trainer to do the training.

4. West Highland White Terrier

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The West Highland White Terrier is better known as the “Westie”. The breed originated in Scotland in the twentieth century and remains popular in the United Kingdom and the United States. The small dog is intelligent, independent, and stubborn. Crate training is a good idea for the Westie because it will give him a safe, comfortable place to lay when he is not being entertained. As a small dog, housebreaking can be difficult so consistency and rewards are necessary. Obedience training should not be limited to training sessions but should be reinforced throughout the day. The Westie is a big barker, so the “quiet” command should be taught early. The Westie is a sweet lap dog. With consistent training, the dog will make a great companion and a wonderful family pet.

3. Basenji

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The Basenji is one of the most ancient breed of dogs. The dog was bred as a hunting dog in central Africa and has since become a popular pet and show dog. With its short hair, pert ears, and curly tail, the Basenji has a distinctive look. What makes this breed difficult to train is its history as a pack dog, training as a hunter, and the fact that it can quickly become boring. The key to training the Basenji is immediate, consistent correction of bad behavior. The dog was bred as a “sighthound” so it is essential to never be harsh with punishment. Correction with positive reinforcement is vital. Patience is a virtue when training the Basenji. Crate training and professional training may be necessary.

2. Dachshund

The German-bred Dachshund is distinctive looking with its short legs and long body. The Dachshund was bred to hunt small burrow dwelling animals and is a member of the hound family. As with other hunting breeds, it will take patience and consistency to properly train your Dachshund. The Dachshund likes people and, if an authoritative relationship is established, the dog will aim to please. Positive reinforcement and calm consistent commands are important when training your Dachshund. Crate training works well with this breed. It is important to remember that Dachshunds have limited attention spans, several short training sessions a day work well.

1. Bulldog

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Very stubborn breed with a short attention span. Training should be done short and sweet. You have to show this dog who is the boss by being stern. Best trained at an early age to avoid complications with its attitude. They are short, sturdy, and stocky. They may look tough, but are gentle and have a friendly temperament. They love attention and can be very persistent about getting it. Best for apartment dwellers particularly the couch potatoes. Just be careful they don’t chew on the couch.

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